Google is committed to advancing racial equity for Black communities. See how.

Magma: Porting Guide

For an overview of Magma including background, hardware requirements, and description of architecture, please see Magma: Overview.

This document gives a process a driver developer can follow to port a Vulkan driver to Fuchsia.

Requirements

Porting a Vulkan driver to Fuchsia requires the following:

  • Hardware documentation (register spec, theory of operation).
  • A reference Vulkan implementation (Linux).
  • The client driver library (ICD) should provide a conformant implementation of Vulkan 1.1/1.2.

The hardware must have passed bringup so that network access, disk storage, and fx pave function.

At the moment Magma only supports UMA devices, but if you're ambitious you could attempt to port to a GPU with discrete memory.

Creating a stub system driver

The Magma system driver (MSD) is analogous to a kernel driver on other operating systems. At this point, consider whether to port an existing kernel driver from another operating system or write one from scratch.

At this point you should read the driver getting started guide to get an understanding of the Fuchsia driver model.

This choice depends on many aspects of the existing kernel driver code. Some considerations:

  • Does the driver have a platform abstraction layer or is it dependent on Linux kernel interfaces?
  • Licensing.
  • How similar is its ioctl interface to the Magma entry-points?

The first coding step is to create a basic MSD that builds. MSDs are located in the driver directory. They are built as driver_modules using the GN build system. The Magma system driver must be open source but not GPL and hosted on fuchsia.googlesource.com.

Fuchsia drivers are normal userspace processes. That means they have access to most of the c library and a subset of POSIX APIs. Unlike most processes, no filesystem access is allowed.

At the moment Magma supports two different device types - platform devices and PCI devices.

  • SoCs generally have platform devices. These are not plug and play, but require a board driver to delegate the appropriate resources to them. Platform devices need a magma_pdev_entry GN target.
  • PCI devices are on the PCI bus and are delegated resources by the PCI bus driver. PCI drivers need special GN targets.

Splitting responsibilities? (SoC version)

On SoCs, the GPU hardware will often come as a separate IP block that can be customized by the SoC vendor. Depending on the level of customization by the vendor, there are a couple of possibilities for how to proceed.

  • Unified MSDs, but with a SoC-specific driver loaded before.
  • Make a separate MSD per SoC or SoC vendor.

If the customizations to the SoC are small, it's better to have a unified MSD. A vendor-specific driver will bind first and will export banjo interfaces for the MSD to power on/off the GPU, change clocks, etc. This has the advantage that it's easier to port the MSD to new hardware without modifications by implementing a new vendor-specific driver. See msd-arm-mali and aml-gpu for an example of this approach.

Having a separate MSD per SoC gives more flexibility and might be necessary if the GPU IP vendor allows many customizations to the IP block in an SoC. MSD implementations for different SoCs may share a library of SoC-independent code, but will be compiled as independent drivers. See msd-img-rgx-mtk for an example of this approach.

Splitting responsibilities? (PCI version)

PCI GPUs often include display controller hardware. The display controller driver should ideally be implemented separately from the GPU hardware, because then it can be stored in bootfs and can provide a boot console before disk access is possible. The display controller should expose a hardware-specific banjo interface and the MSD can bind to the display driver.

See msd-intel-gen and intel-i915 for an example of a PCI driver that's split into two parts.

Powering on

With the MSD now building, the next step is to write code to reset the device and get it into operating mode. This may include:

The driver should also get access to MMIO ranges as needed and should start handling interrupts. For SoCs, the board driver must be modified to pass these resources to the MSD or SoC-specific driver and must add a device for the MSD to bind to.

Testing at this stage:

  • Logging MMIO registers on driver startup.

Implementing the MSD

Here is an organized list of the main functions the driver can implement:

  • Initialize hardware
    • msd_driver_create
    • msd_driver_configure
    • msd_driver_destroy
    • msd_driver_create_device
    • msd_device_destroy
  • Support for parameter querying
    • msd_device_query
  • Support for status dump
    • msd_device_dump_status
  • Create connections
    • msd_device_open
    • msd_connection_close
  • Create buffers
    • msd_buffer_import
    • msd_buffer_destroy
  • Set up memory spaces and buffer mappings
    • msd_connection_map_buffer_gpu
    • msd_connection_unmap_buffer_gpu
    • msd_connection_commit_buffer
    • msd_connection_release_buffer
  • Set up hardware contexts
    • msd_connection_create_context
    • msd_context_destroy
  • Command buffer scheduling
    • msd_context_execute_command_buffer
    • msd_context_execute_immediate_commands
    • msd_connection_set_notification_callback
  • Create semaphores
    • msd_semaphore_import
    • msd_semaphore_destroy
  • Fault handling
  • Power management

With the hardware successfully powering on, the next step is to decide how to map your existing ioctls onto MSD entry-points.

In most cases, the mapping between linux DRI ioctls and MSD functions is straightforward. One exception is the case of memory management: in Magma, it's the ICD that allocates and maps memory, not the MSD (or kernel driver). This may change the flow around some commands that allocate VMOs, since the MSD has to import already-existing buffers into the GPU hardware.

If that approach doesn't work for some types of memory, a driver may use a Sysmem heap to handle allocation of that memory. The client allocates memory using Sysmem and imports the handle using the normal Magma interface. Then the MSD can communicate with sysmem to get more information about the memory.

Drivers may not require implementations of all functions. We recommend implementing MSD functions gradually as needed by the ICD. This can provide context when implementing the MSD functions and can help avoid wasted effort on unneeded functions.

Testing at this stage:

  • driver-specific unit tests (not hardware-specific)
  • hardware-specific driver tests (see an example). These tests should exercise the GPU in a minimal way, such as writing to a register or causing the GPU to modify a memory location.
  • driver-specific integration tests that use the Magma interface.
  • magma-abi-conformance-tests (part of Magma L0).
  • magma-info-test (part of Magma L0).

Building the ICD

The ICD must be ported to Fuchsia. ICD code must be checked out with the rest of the Fuchsia tree and built along with the rest of Fuchsia.

The ICD may be either given a completely new GN build, or the Fuchsia GN build can execute actions in the driver's existing build system.

Because of ICD abi restrictions, ICDs must be statically linked against all their dependencies. An ICD must be a single shared library, and may only reference libc.so and libzircon.so. At this stage you can stub out all other references as necessary. The ICD must also link to libmagma, which provides the Magma runtime.

After the ICD is built, the Fuchsia GN build must store it into the system image. You also need to create some config_data with a manifest JSON file to identify the ICD to the Vulkan loader. See intel's GN file for an example of this.

The ICD must export a certain set of symbols - see the Vulkan ABI definition. You should implement them at this point.

Testing at this stage:

  • readelf -d on the shared library to ensure it has no dependencies besides libc.so and libzircon.so.
  • Checking /system/lib on the device for presence of the ICD.
  • Run the icd_load test. This test will check if any ICD on the system works, so ensure no other ICDs are on the system before running it.

Connect the ICD to Magma

At this point the ICD should connect to /dev/class/gpu/ using zxio and provide that device to libmagma using magma_device_import.

After this stage the [magma_*][magmheader] functions will work, so ioctl calls can gradually be converted over to equivalent Magma calls.

Testing at this stage:

  • vkreadback (draws a color then reads back the framebuffer values). This is part of Magma L0).
  • Vulkan conformance testing. Ideally a 100% pass rate will be seen after this stage is completed. See the Magma testing strategy for details.

Remove disallowed symbols

Use the version script when linking your ICD to ensure it only exposes the symbols allowed by the Fuchsia system ABI.

Only symbols listed in the symbol allow list may be used from the ICD. To check this, either pass the allowlist to imported_symbols_allowlist in your magma_vulkan_icd target or use the verify_imported_symbols GN template to check your prebuilt ICD.

Some unsupported file operations may be replaced with calls to the OpenInNamespace callback provided to vk_icdInitializeOpenInNamespaceCallback.

Testing at this stage:

  • verify_imported_symbols succeeds.

Implement Fuchsia extensions

At this point, the ICD can't be used with scenic and doesn't have window system integration. The driver must implement Fuchsia-specific Vulkan extensions. The client driver library should provide a conformant implementation of Vulkan 1.0/1.1/1.2.

These are currently WIP and subject to change, but can be found in the Fuchsia internal Vulkan header.

VK_FUCHSIA_external_memory

This extension is similar to VK_KHR_external_memory_fd and allows importing/exporting VkDeviceMemory from/to VMOs.

Testing at this stage:

  • vkext --gtest_filter=VulkanExtension.* (part of Magma L0).

VK_FUCHSIA_external_semaphore

This extension is similar to VK_KHR_external_semaphore_fd and allows importing/exporting binary semaphores to/from zircon events. These imports have reference transference, unlike VK_EXTERNAL_SEMAPHORE_HANDLE_TYPE_SYNC_FD_BIT_KHR which have copy transference.

Testing at this stage:

  • vkext --gtest_filter=VulkanExtension.* (part of Magma L0).
  • vulkan-cts-zircon (part of the Vulkan CTS).

VK_FUCHSIA_buffer_collection

This extension interacts with sysmem and allows clients to negotiate image formats and allocate memory. See the sysmem documentation for more details.

Testing at this stage:

Validation

All tests listed in each of the subsections above must pass. See the test strategy documentation for more details and a complete list of test cases.

Long term support

The MSD and ICD must be updated with new code drops from the hardware vendor. Ideally the code is upstreamed and the GPU vendor will supply and maintain the system driver using the Zircon DDK.